Home
About Us
Our Services
New Patients
Forms & Policies
Medical Resources
   Emergencies
   Medical Conditions
      Abdominal Pain, Recurrent
      Acne
      Acute Ear Infections and Your Child
      Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia
      Acute Otitis Media
      Acute Strep Throat
      Addison
      ADHD and Your School-aged Child
      AIDS/HIV
      Allergies in Children
      Anaphylaxis
      Anemia and Your Young Child
      Anesthesia and Your Child
      Ankle Sprain Treatment (Care of the Young Athlete)
      Antibiotics and Your Child
      Anxiety
      Appendicitis
      Asthma
      Asthma and Exercise (Care of the Young Athlete)
      Asthma and Your Child
      Asthma Triggers
      Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema)
      Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
      Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
      Breast Enlargement, Premature
      Breath-Holding Spells
      Bronchiolitis
      Bronchiolitis and Your Young Child
      Care of the Premature Infant
      Celiac Disease
      Chickenpox
      Chickenpox Immunization
      Chickenpox Vaccine, The
      Coarctation of the Aorta
      Colds
      Common Childhood Infections
      Congenital Hip Dysplasia
      Constipation
      Constipation and Your Child
      Coxsackie A16
      Croup
      Croup and Your Young Child
      Croup: When Your Child Needs Hospital Care
      Crying and Your Baby: How to Calm a Fussy or Colicky Baby
      Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome (CVS)
      Depression
      Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip
      Diabetic Mother, Infant of
      Diaper Rash
      Diarrhea and Dehydration
      Diarrhea, Vomiting, and Water Loss (Dehydration)
      Ear Infection
      Ear Infections
      Eating Disorders
      Eczema
      Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis)
      Enlarged Lymph Nodes
      Erythema Multiforme
      Eye Problems Related to Headache
      Febrile Seizure
      Febrile Seizures
      Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
      Fever
      Fever and Your Child
      Fifth Disease
      Fifth Disease (Erythema Infectiosum)
      Flu
      Flu, The
      Food Allergies and Your Child
      Food Born Illnesses
      Fragile X Syndrome
      Gastroenteritis, Viral
      Gastroesophageal Reflux
      Giardiasis
      Guide to Children's Dental Health, A
      Hand Foot and Mouth
      Hand-Foot-and-Mouth Disease
      Head Lice
      Headache Related to Eye Problems
      Hemangioma
      Hepatitis A
      Hepatitis A Immunization
      Hepatitis B
      Hepatitis B Immunization
      Hepatitis C
      Hib Immunization
      High Blood Pressure
      Hip Dysplasia (Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip)
      HIV/AIDS
      How to Take Your Child's Temperature?
      Hyperactivity
      Hypertension
      Hypothyroidism
      Immunization
      Infant of a Diabetic Mother
      Infectious Mononucleosis
      Influenza Immunization
      Influenza-Seasonal
      Inhaled and Intranasal Corticosteroids and Your Child
      Kawasaki Syndrome
      Language Development in Young Children
      Lead Poisoning
      Leukemia
      Lung Hypoplasia
      Lyme Disease
      Lymphadenopathy
      Measles
      Mental Health
      Middle Ear Fluid and Your Child
      MMR Immunization
      Molluscum Contagiosum
      Mumps
      Obesity in Childhood
      Osgood-Schlatter Disease
      Otitis Media, Acute
      Pneumococcal Conjugate Immunization
      Pneumonia and Your Child
      Polio Immunization
      Premature Thelarche
      Prematurity
      Prematurity, Retinopathy of
      Pulmonary Hypertension
      Pulmonary Hypertension (PPH & SPH)
      Retinopathy of Prematurity
      Rheumatic Fever, Acute
      Ringworm (Tinea)
      Roseola
      Rotavirus
      Rubella (German Measles)
      Safety of Blood Transfusions
      Scabies
      Seasonal Influenza (Flu) 2014–2015
      Separation Anxiety
      Sinusitis
      Sinusitis and Your Child
      Sleep Apnea and Your Child
      Smoking
      Speech Development in Young Children
      Stevens-Johnson Syndrome
      Strep Throat
      Strep Throat-Acute
      Strep Throat-Recurrent
      Stuttering and the Young Child
      Swine Flu
      Swine Flu (H1N1) FAQ
      Swine Flu (H1N1) Vaccine
      Swollen Glands
      Tattoos
      Tear Duct, Blocked
      Tetralogy of Fallot
      Thyroid Problems
      Tinea (ringworm infection)
      Tonsils and the Adenoid
      Toxic Shock Syndrome
      Toxoplasmosis
      Turner Syndrome
      Type 2 Diabetes: Tips for Healthy Living
      Underdeveloped Lungs
      Urinary Tract Infection
      Urinary Tract Infections in Young Children
      Varicella or Chickenpox
      Varivax Immunization
      Vesicoureteral Reflux
      Wheezing-Infant
      Whooping Cough (Pertussis)
      Wilson Disease
   What's Going Around?
   Pediatrics
Contact Us

Practice News

Anywhere Family Practice is thrilled to announce the addition of Dr. Julie Johnson to our team.
We will be transitioning to a new patient portal in April. Watch for new updates on this website!

Is Your Child Sick?TM

 

Are You Sick?



How to Take Your Child's Temperature

Print, Share, or View Spanish version of this article

Your temperature (TEM-pruh-chur) is how warm or cold your body is. Normal temperature for a child is 98°F to 99°F or 37°C. The small circle (°) means “degrees.” Anything over 100.4°F or 38°C is a fever. (See “Words to Know” for “F” and “C.”)

There are many ways to check your child's temperature. Always use a digital (DIJ-uh-tul) thermometer (thur-MOM-uh-tur). These show the temperature in numbers in a little window.

Don’t use a mercury thermometer (the kind with silver liquid inside). They are dangerous if they break.

This is how you read and say the temperature:

100.2° This means “One hundred point two degrees.” 102° This means “One hundred and two degrees.”

Be sure to read it carefully. There is a big difference between 100.2° and 102°.

In Child's Bottom (Rectal)

  • Turn on the thermometer.

  • Put some lubricating (LOO-bruh-kay-ting) jelly on the small end to help it slide in. KY Jelly, Surgilube, and Vaseline are brands of lubricating jelly.

  • Lay your child across your lap or on something firm, face up or face down.

  • Put one hand on your child's back if the child is face down.

    If the child is face up, bend your child's legs to his or her chest. Rest your free hand against the backs of the thighs. This will help your child hold still.

  • Gently put the small end of the thermometer in your child's bottom where poop comes out (rectum). Put it in 1/2-inch deep.

  • Cup your hand over your child's bottom. Then hold the thermometer between the base of 2 fingers so it doesn't slip out.

  • Take it out after a minute or so, or when it signals that it is done. It may beep, stop flashing, or light up. Read the number.

In Child's Mouth (Oral)

  • Turn on the thermometer.

  • Put the small end of the thermometer under your child's tongue. Put it as far back as you can without hurting your child.

  • Have your child close his or her lips around the thermometer. Hold it there.

  • Take it out after a minute or so, or when it signals that it is done. It may beep, stop flashing, or light up. Read the number.

Under Child's Arm (Axillary)

  • Turn on the thermometer.

  • Put the small end of the thermometer in your child's armpit.

  • Hold your child's arm tightly against his or her side. With your other hand, hold the thermometer in place.

  • Take it out after a minute or so, or when it signals that it is done. It may beep, stop flashing, or light up. Read the number.

Taking Temperature by Age

Child's Age

Ways to Take Temperature

Newborn to 3 months old

In child's bottom (rectal)

3 months to 3 years old

In child's bottom (rectal) or under child's arm (axillary)*

4 to 5 years old

In child's mouth (oral) or bottom (rectal) or under child's arm (axillary)*

Older than 5 years

In child's mouth (oral) or bottom (rectal) or under child's arm (axillary)*

*Taking your child's temperature in the mouth or bottom gives a better reading than taking it under the arm.

Tips

  • Wash the small end of the thermometer before and after using it. Use soap and cool water, not hot.

  • Label the thermometer “oral” or “rectal.” Don't use the same thermometer in both places. (You can use both kinds under the arm.)

  • If your child has had a hot or cold drink, wait 15 minutes before taking your child's temperature by mouth.

  • If you have questions about other kinds of thermometers, like ear or temporal (tem-PUR-ul) artery thermometers, ask your child's doctor.

  • Remember: A fever is anything over 100.4°F or 38°C.

Copyright © 2008